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Comfort my people

Nachamu, Nachamu Ami…
Listen here for Neshama Carlebach's beautiful rendition of the opening of this week's haftorah:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFAFOQlBCmw&list=PLPQFCYsbHfHEawXD4VCyKZS8eVyvIz57j

Comfort me, comfort my people opens this week's haftorah. After Tisha B'Av, we remind ourselves that we are counting down to Rosh Hashanah, to the opportunity of redemption, repentance, tshuvah, and the resulting forgiveness. How often do we think about our capability for change?

So often we live in a world that assumes our own immutability. We see the world around us and even ourselves as static. We say you can't teach an old dog new tricks.

And yet, and yet, and yet our tradition says the opposite. Our counter-cultural Jewish tradition reminds us that we ALWAYS have the capability to change. It doesn't matter if we are 4 or 104. We can choose our destiny. We have the free will to create new opportunities for ourselves. We can hit reset-right now.

As you listen to Neshama's beautiful rendition of her father's song, think about what you are going to work on this year. Don't get trapped into thinking your life is what it is today. What small steps will you take? What big steps will they lead to? Are you satisfied with yourself and the world around or can you make new partnerships to improve both?

Shabbat shalom a wee bit early!

Destruction and rebirth

Observing Tisha B'Av and its accompanying fast is far too rare in this modern world. It is a commemoration observed mid-summer, when people are away and children are at camp. In fact, it is only at camp that many Jewish children ever hear of this holy day. Yet the day can be one of the most meaningful, giving us a time to mourn the losses of our history.

Tisha B'Av commemorates the destruction of both the First and Second Temples. Remembering the holy site where the Jewish people once had the opportunity to unite and worship together, we read the Book of Lamentations by candlelight. Sitting on the floor we find the past feels more present. The mournful chanting of the short book, of Eicha, shows us how brutal and terrible life can be. Yet when we look around the world, we see that for too many, the world is still brutal and terrible.

For almost two thousand years, it was incredibly difficult for Jews to return to their holy cities. Israel was off limits for most Jews. The journey was too difficult; the conditions too challenging; the borders closes.

Today we can book a flight and stay in five star hotels. Jewish sovereignty seems reborn. It is incredibly hopeful.

Yet we still see violence. The last few weeks have seen great contention at our most holy sites. Peace still seems distant, yet calm appears briefly.

As we fast (or not) tonight and tomorrow, let us pray for peace. Let us hope that the days to come will see true cooperation. The glimmers of hope are there. Redemption seems possible. Let us play our roles and work toward it.

Peace will come with faith and work.